Monthly Archives: March 2018

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24 Hour Protest against…

24-hour protest against IR35 proposed A national day of action against is being proposed by a campaigner. Contractor Mike Gibson, of Changeir35.com, believes a 24-hour event should be used to protest against the of the being extended to the private sector. “[At this early] planning stage”, he said “[the event involves] a march to the Houses of Parliament, a few speeches and a petition [delivered]….to 10 Downing Street.” “The intent is to show the volume of support for and send a clear message that .” Gibson will also build and upload a directory of MPs’ responses to , to record their stance on the rule and create a log of the arguments for and against . But another IR35 critic, Graham Fisher, thinks that despite a consultation on the extension being , officials have likely already decided that it will go ahead. “Our general view is that HM Treasury and HMRC are not accepting any evidence pointing to the public sector changes being anything other than a . “If HMRC continues on their current course we should expect the same to be introduced into the ”. Fisher, who is managing director of accountants Orange Genie added: “In the unlikely event that they recognise the failure of the public sector implementation, any changes might be delayed to 2020.”  

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Shortage of bricks, blocks…

House builders are being hampered by a shortage of construction materials including roof tiles, bricks and blocks. It has been reported that sites across the country are flagging-up shortages as an increasing problem. One industry source said: “Bricks and blocks are in short supply but the real problem is sourcing enough roof tiles. “Firms are having to look further afield to Europe for potential suppliers now because the domestic supply is stretched to the limit.”   The issue was flagged-up by Taylor Wimpey in its results yesterday. The firm said: “Availability of materials is generally in line with demand but there remain pinch points with key products such as bricks, blocks and roof tiles. “The cost of these key products has risen significantly and whilst other material costs have been stable in 2017 we are experiencing more cost pressure coming into 2018. “The Group has agreed product lines and volumes with key suppliers to mitigate long lead times and shortages.” Persimmon also announced this week that it is building an in-house roof tile production plant which is expected to come on stream later this year. The UK’s largest house builder already has its own brick manufacturing plant.   Persimmon said: “We recognise that with the continued increase in industry output the availability of skilled trade resources and some key materials to support further growth continues to be a constraint.”

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New construction contract awards…

  The latest figures from the ONS indicate the construction sector in the UK declined by 0.7% between Quarter 3 and Quarter 4 2017. This followed a decline of 0.7% between Quarter 2 and Quarter 3. Two consecutive quarters of decline is defi ned as a technical recession, so this is the interpretation from these fi gures. However, it should be noted that in December 2017 the industry grew by 1.6% (see fi g. 2.1). The main reason for the quarterly decrease in output are falls in all types of repair and maintenance as well as private commercial work. Non housing repair and maintenance declined by 2.4% in the quarter while the corresponding private housing fi gure showed a decline of 1.7%. New work in the private commercial sector declined by 4.4% between Q3 and Q4. Over the same period output in the industrial sector fell by 3.1%. The one sector which continues to grow is new private residential. This sector increased by 5% in Q4 compared to Q3 2017. The challenge will be whether continued growth in housing can off set the declines in the other large sectors such as commercial. CPA/Barbour ABI Index The CPA/Barbour ABI Index which measures the level of contracts awarded using January 2010 as its base month recorded a reading of 127 for January (see fi g. 2.2). This is a slight increase from..

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Construction apprentices will earn…

Construction apprentices will earn thousands of pounds more than many university graduates. Latest research by the Federation of Master Builders (FMB) quizzed small contractors on how much they pay tradespeople. The highest reported ammual salary for a London bricklayer was £90,0000. The average annual salaries were:   Site managers earn £51,266 Plumbers earn £48,675 Supervisors earn £48,407 Electricians earn £47,265 Civil engineering operatives earn £44,253 Steel fixers earn £44,174 Roofers earn £42,303 Bricklayers earn £42,034 Carpenters and joiners earn £41,413 Plasterers earn £41,045 Scaffolders earn £40,942 Floorers earn £39,131 Plant operatives earn £38,409 Painters and decorators earn £34,587 General construction operatives earn £32,392 In comparison government figures show the UK’s university graduates earn the following average annual salaries: Pharmacists earn £42,252 Dental practitioners earn £40,268 Architects earn £38,228 Teachers earn £37,805 Chartered and certified accountants earn £37,748 Midwives earn £36,188 Veterinarians earn £36,446 Physiotherapists earn £32,065 Nurses earn £31,867 FMB Chief Executive Brian Berry said: “Money talks and when it comes to annual salaries, a career in construction trumps many university graduate roles. “The average university graduate in England earns £32,000 a year whereas our latest research shows that your average bricky or roofer is earning £42,000 a year across the UK. In London, a bricklayer is commanding wages of up to £90,000 a year. “Pursuing a career in construction is therefore becoming an increasingly savvy move. University students in..

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Average salaries for Construction…

The average salary in construction management has hit £81,609 according to the latest pay survey of UK property professionals by RICS. And that is topped-up by an average annual bonus of £22,252. Construction management was one of the best paid professions in the survey which covered 42 disciplines. Across all property professions base salaries grew on average by 12% to £58,633.   Quantity surveyors earned an average of £56,212 with an annual bonus of £5,754. RICS qualified professionals are earning 21% more than their counterparts and 14.2% of those who received a pay rise in the last year did so through gaining professional qualifications. Barry Cullen, RICS Diversity & Inclusion Director said: “The latest results from this survey show the built environment continues to be an attractive sector to work in with professionals’ pay hitting highs not seen since the financial crisis. “As headcount is once again expected to increase in 2018, more employers are placing greater focus on attracting and retaining talent, with attractive pay and benefit packages. “However, organisations must embrace an offering beyond an attractive salary and benefits package if we are going to truly diversify the profession and meets the needs of our future. “In 2018, the gender pay gap still remains evident and whilst it is significantly less for those under 26, more still needs to be done.”    

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Gender pay gap in…

Laing O’Rourke has recorded the lowest inequality in pay between men and women among Britain’s top 30 main contractors. The firm’s record on equal pay was revealed as thousands of employers with over 250 staff were forced to published their gender pay gap figures for the first time. The Government hopes this will help to shine a light on the barriers preventing women from reaching the top. Construction ranks as one of the worst industries for pay inequality with women paid 36% less than men on average. The first returns by leading main contractors reveals Laing O’Rourke is way ahead on pay equality with women on average paid just under 9% less than men. Companies had to file data based on a “snapshot” of their payroll taken on 5 April 2017. The discrepancy among major players is widened because fewer women are among the top earners in the industry. This appears to have impacted BAM Construct which recorded the highest pay gap and women accounting for 68% of the lowest quartile of earners in its workforce. The listing of the top 30 main contractors recently compiled is ranked by the median, which gives a good sense of where a company is overall, the mean figures will include the outliers with large salaries. Main contractor pay gap reports Hourly rate % lower than men % of women in pay quartile Mean..

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Construction workloads remain robust…

Construction workloads in Yorkshire and the Humber remained resilient, despite bad weather and a pessimistic economic outlook, in the first quarter of 2018. According to the Construction and Infrastructure Market Survey from ROCS, in the first quarter of the year (Q1 2018), 25% more chartered surveyors in Yorkshire and Humber reported that their workloads had risen as opposed to fallen. While 63% of respondents noted bad weather conditions as a limiting factor, the ‘Beast from the East’ was not enough to slow the pace of growth. Looking at workloads across all subsectors; both new work and repair and maintenance activity rose steadily in the early months of 2018. Infrastructure saw the strongest rise in workloads with 24% more respondents seeing an increase in activity (up from 19% in Q4 2017) – the most positive reading since the beginning of 2017. In the public housing sector, 20% more contributors reported a rise in workloads (up from 18% in Q4 2017), whilst in the Private Housing sector activity also increased, with 39% of respondents seeing a rise in workloads (up from 37% in Q4 2017). However, in the private industrial sector, workloads dropped quite considerably, with 8% of respondents reporting a rise in work on such projects (down from 28% back in Q4 2017). Contributors also noted a fall in workloads in the private commercial sector, with 21% reporting an increase in..

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Venian Recruitment Join The…

We are pleased to announce that Venian Recruitment are now REC members. This reflects our commitment to operating to the highest standards under the REC Code of Professional Conduct.

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Permanent staff appointments increase…

Permanent staff appointments increase at weakest pace for four months     Key points:    Softer rise in perm placements contrasts with steeper increase in temp billings Growth of demand for staff picks up for first time in nine months Steeper decline in overall candidate availability leads to sharper rises in paySummary:The IHS Markit/REC Report on Jobs – published today – provides the most comprehensive guide to the UK labour market, drawing on original survey data provided by recruitment consultancies.  Permanent placements growth softens to four-month lowThe number of people placed into permanent job roles continued to rise markedly in April. That said, the pace of expansion was the softest seen in 2018 so far. In contrast, growth of temp billings picked up from March’s 13-month low.Candidate availability continues to fall markedlyCandidate availability for both permanent and temporary roles declined further at the start of the second quarter. Furthermore, the rates of reduction quickened to three- and five-month records, respectively.Demand for staff strengthensGrowth of overall job vacancies picked up to a three-month high in April. Permanent staff demand grew at a sharper pace compared to the previous month, while short-term staff vacancies expanded at a slightly softer (but still marked) pace. Pay growth gathers paceStarting salaries for permanent workers continued to rise sharply in April, with the rate of inflation picking up from March. Concurrently, rates of pay for contract/temporary staff..

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Construction T level students…

Construction T level students will not be “site ready”  The Government must be realistic about the capabilities and work-readiness of students who have completed construction T Levels. That is the warning from the Federation of Master Builders after plans for the practical alternative to A Levels were confirmed this week. The first schools and colleges to teach the new technical qualifications will offer courses from 2020 with construction among the first subjects. FMB Chief Eexecutive Brian Berry said: “The idea that a student who has completed a T Level in bricklaying is able to call themselves a qualified bricklayer is not credible. “The Government must be realistic about how much can be achieved in two years of largely college-based learning. “Although T Levels include a three-month work placement, when the rest of the individual’s knowledge and skills are acquired in the classroom, in construction they will need more time onsite, post-T Level, before they can and should describe themselves as being qualified in that trade. “Small and medium-sized construction firms, which do the bulk of training in our industry, would rather view T Levels as a rich pool of talent through which to find apprentices.” Berry added: “More positively, the Government has listened to the concerns of the construction industry and stated its intention to make work placements as flexible as possible. “In construction, work placements are not popular or..

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